What’s your favorite scary movie? Alrinthea Carter edition

Read Time:5 Minute
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on email
Email

Alrinthea Carter is an Emmy-nominated writer with a horror habit. I know Alrinthea from drag race podcasts we’ve both been on over the last few years. She always cracks me up, and we have a lot of overlap when it comes to randomly specific pop culture categories. I know her work because A Black Lady Sketch Show was the only real reason to subscribe to HBO Max (we still use her Christian name here because who the hell is Max?). Anyway, Alrinthea is as funny and insightful as you would suspect a writer on that that wrongly canceled show to be. This is why after hearing some of her horror deep dives, I did the math and realized she should have to do one of these lists I’m subjecting all my favorites to. 

As usual, this favorite didn’t come to play with us. Alrinthea Thee Carter sent back five titles after my own heart. I shouldn’t have been surprised because I know Alrinthea was working on a horror script pre the WGA strike that I want my eyeballs on as soon as the execs do the right thing so the industry can get back to work. Anywho, let me share this list that is possibly my favorite I’ve seen so far. This is saying something because all my favorite industry people seem to have taste! 

Get Out (2017)
Where You Can Watch: VOD
A Black man visits his white girlfriend’s parents and discovers this family has sinister plans for him. Because Key & Peele had horror elements, I wasn’t surprised that Jordan Peele had been secretly waiting to fully snap in the horror genre. I also love this being on Alrinthea’s list because she also comes from a comedy background and has a well-established love of scary movies. I have also argued very loudly that the horror beats in A Black Lady Sketch Show make it a genre-bending ride. I’m not saying Alrinthea and Jordan will be sitting at the same tables soon, with me screaming, “I know her!” from outside the function. However, I’m not not saying that, and I hope Uncle Jordan at least waves at me while I’m making a scene. 

Us (2019)
Where You Can Watch: VOD
A family’s vacation gets turned upside down when their doppelgängers show up and try to kill them. That family is not getting the deposit back on that AirBnB, but we have an underrated horror gem, so…it’s worth it. I love that this one is on the list because many people act like Get Out is Jordan Peele’s only movie of note. I always ask those people disrespectfully what they’re smoking because each of his films hits if you’re willing to pay attention. I’m still trying to figure out my ranking of the PCU (Peele Cinematic Universe), so it’s nice to know Alrinthea also needs to have a couple of them in rotation at all times.

Scream (1996)
Where You Can Watch: Paramount+
A teen finds herself terrorized on the anniversary of her mother’s murder. Scream is that girl. This movie should be required viewing for slasher fans and horror movie buffs. Because August is the month of Wes Craven’s birthday, and the anniversary of his death, this movie has been on my mind lately. It’s arguably one of his most popular works alongside A Nightmare on Elm Street and for valid reasons. I just rewatched the entire franchise a couple of months ago. However, I might do it again on August 30th to chase away the sads when the timeline remembers that’s the day we lost one of the best.

Candyman (2021)
Where You Can Watch: Prime Video
Monkeypaw put the Candyman legacy into the hands of Black creators that explored gentrification in Chicago. I also love this movie! I’m here for the conversation about the stories we tell, who gets to tell the stories, and for finally decentering whiteness in this franchise. Nia DaCosta gave us art that will hopefully motivate more of us to reclaim and take control of our narratives. After all, I know I’m tired of people talking about us while silencing us and refusing to make room at the table. I also clocked that this is the third Monkeypaw joint on Alrinthea’s list. Because I’m a Monkeypaw stan account, I support her choices. I can be found giving all three of these movies 10s across the board on various social media accounts. 

Alien (1979)
Where You Can Watch: Hulu
The crew of a spacecraft refuses to listen to a woman and wakes up an Alien that is not having it. I love that so many of my favorites understand this is a horror movie after decades of film bros being strong and wrong about it not belonging in the genre. It makes me love each of them a little bit more. This, along with all the other movies on the list, makes me think Alrinthea is here for karmic justice. “In space, no one can hear you scream,” but an alien will throw hands if you want to fuck around and find out. Let’s be honest, many people in Candyman and Get Out learned that lesson on Earth from Black folks who were over it. I LOVE to see it.

Now that Alrinthea Carter is done pulling these titles from my diary, I can celebrate another one of my favorites coming through here with taste. She brought a list that makes me want to write an essay on these movies where karma catches people who tried it. These movies scream that you should listen to women, stop interrupting Black folks, and stay in your lane. As a Gemini, I support those messages. Because I know you are now a fan of Ms.Carter, I’m going to suggest you follow her on Instagram, Twitter, and her website. I’m also going to suggest you keep an eye out for this horror script that will hopefully be one of the first things greenlit when the strike ends. In the meantime, rewatch A Black Lady Sketch Show and listen for me screaming, “I know her,” from outside your house when you watch season 3’s credits.

About Post Author

Alma

Horror is kind of my thing. I consume so much horror that it leaks into my dreams and creates the most uncomfortable sleep paralysis episodes. Just ask the shadow man at the end of the bed, he’ll tell you. I don’t consider myself a professional critic, mainly because I don’t get paid, but I do enjoy discussing horror with anyone who will listen.